roux

Garbanzo Bean Roux

Here is a great way to thicken soups and sauces using a gluten free roux. The same ratios apply here as they do with a traditional roux, and you don’t need to cook it like a traditional roux unless you want more of a toasted bean flavor.

Garbanzo Bean Roux
Will thicken about six cups of stock for soups

1/4# Butter
1/4# Garbanzo Bean Flour

Melt the butter on the stove.
Add flour and stir, turn heat to low and toast for one minute.
Cool and use later or create soup or sauce from here.

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After the roux has chilled I cut it into pieces and drop them into my soup.

Beurre Manie

Beurre Manie translates into kneaded butter.  It is very similar to a roux and may be used in all the same applications that call for a blonde roux, the difference is that a beurre manie is not cooked.  Take equal parts warm butter and flour, mix together until incorporated.  In this recipe I add sage, you can substitute any herbs that you would like.  I make large batches and store it in the refrigerator for later use. The freezer is also a good place to store it if you don’t see yourself using it in the near future.

Buerre Manie

4bnchs    Sage

1#           Butter (Room Temp)

1#           Flour

  • Rough chop the sage.
  • Place all ingredients into a mixing bowl and either mix by hand or with the paddle attachment on the Kitchen aid until a dough is achieved.

Remember, once added to a soup or sauce, it needs to cook for a short period of time to remove the flour taste.

Roux

A roux is used as a thickener for gravy, other sauces, soups and stews. It is typically made from equal parts of flour and fat by weight. A traditional roux, used in most European cooking, consists of equal parts butter and flour. In Cajun cuisine, a roux is almost always made with oil instead of butter and cooked until dark brown in color, which lends more richness of flavor but less thickening power. The two different stages of a roux that are most commonly used are:

Blonde Roux: Used for soups and sauces that need to be thickened and kept a light color.

Brown Roux: Used in Cajun cooking or making sauces that need to be kept a dark color.  A brown roux will also add a slight nutty flavor from the cooked flour